Disaster Prepareness and Relief Resources

The following resources were compiled by the National Mental Health Consumers’ Self-Help Clearinghouse as part of a curriculum on disaster preparedness training for peer specialists, developed in conjunction with the Temple University Collaborative on Community Inclusion. Thank you Susan Rogers for this contribution.
  • American Red Cross “Disaster Mental Health Handbook”: click here.
  • Café TA Center “Disaster Preparedness for Persons with Mental Health Needs”: click here
  • Cambridge University Press Variations in Disaster Preparedness by Mental Health, Perceived General Health, and Disability Status: click here
  • Des Pres, Terrence. “The Survivor: An Anatomy of Life in the Death Camps”: click here.
  • “Disaster Mental Health: A Critical Response, A Training Curriculum for Mental Health and Spiritual Care Professionals in Healthcare Settings”: click here.
  • Frankl, Viktor. “Man’s Search for Meaning”: click here.
  • Galea, S., et al. 2003. “Trends of probable post-traumatic stress disorder in New York City after the September 11 terrorist attacks”: click here.
  • interNational Association of Peer Supporters (iNAPS) “Recovery to Practice Curriculum Outline: Final Draft”: click here.
  • National Biodefense Science Board Disaster Mental Health Subcommittee “Integration of Mental and Behavioral Health in Federal Disaster Preparedness, Response, and Recovery: Assessment and Recommendations”: click here
  • National Coalition for Mental Health Recovery “Peer Support: Why It Works”: click here
  • National Empowerment Center “From Relief to Recovery: Peer Support by Consumers Relieves the traumas of Disasters and Facilitates Recovery from Mental Illness”: click here
  • National Mental Health Consumers’ Self-Help Clearinghouse “Focus on Disaster and Recovery”: click here
  • New England Journal of Medicine “Moving Mental Health into the Disaster Preparedness Spotlight”: click here
  • New England MIRECC (Mental Illness Research, Education and Clinical CentersPeer Education Center Continuing Education Series: “Walking the Tightrope Between Helping Others & Maintaining Your Own Wellness”: click here
  • Norris, FH; Friedman, MJ; Watson, PJ. “60,000 disaster victims speak: Part I. An empirical review of the empirical literature, 1981-2001”:click here.
  • Norris, FH; Friedman, MJ; Watson, PJ. “60,000 disaster victims speak: Part II. Summary and implications of the disaster mental health research”: click here.
  • Powell, I. “The Power of a Peer Provider.” Appalachian Consulting Group, April 2013: click here.
  • PTSD: National Center for PTSD, U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs, “Mental Health Effects Following Disaster: Risk and Resilience Factors”: click here
  • Ready.gov “Basic Disaster Supplies Kit”: click here
  • Salzer, Mark S., Ph.D., “Disaster Community Support Network of Philadelphia, a program of the Mental Health Association of Southeastern Pennsylvania”: click here.
  • Society for Community Research and Action Task Force for Disaster, Community Readiness and Recovery “How to Help Your Community Recover from Disaster: A Manual for Planning and Action”: click here
  • Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration “Building Bridges: Mental Health Consumers and Representatives of the Disaster Response Community in Dialogue”: click here
  • Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration Disaster Distress Helpline: click here
  • Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration “Disaster Preparedness, Response and Recovery”: click here
  • Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration “A Mental Health Response to Disaster” Webinar Slides: click here Recording:click here
  • Temple University Collaborative on Community Inclusion “Advance Self-Advocacy Plan”: click here for a planning document and click herefor a guidebook.
  • University of Rochester “Disaster Mental Health: A Critical Response, A Training Curriculum for Mental Health and Spiritual Care Professionals in Healthcare Settings”: click here

SAMHSA’s Bringing Recovery Supports to Scale Technical Assistance Center Strategy (BRSS TACS) September 28, 2017 Recovery LIVE! event included two experts on how to increase peer-run, recovery community, family-run, and youth and young adult-run organizational preparedness to continue its critical work during times of crisis or public health emergencies. Handouts from the event included:

Do you have emergency preparedness or disaster relief resources that would be helpful to share with peers? Feel free to leave a comment below.

One thought on “Disaster Prepareness and Relief Resources

  1. SAMHSA has a Disaster Distress Hotline:
    https://www.samhsa.gov/find-help/disaster-distress-helpline

    The Disaster Distress Helpline, 1-800-985-5990, is a 24/7, 365-day-a–year, national hotline dedicated to providing immediate crisis counseling for people who are experiencing emotional distress related to any natural or human-caused disaster. This toll-free, multilingual, and confidential crisis support service is available to all residents in the United States and its territories. Stress, anxiety, and other depression-like symptoms are common reactions after a disaster. Call 1-800-985-5990 or text TalkWithUs to 66746 to connect with a trained crisis counselor.

    COMMENT: I wonder if this helpline is — or would ever be — staffed by peer specialists who have survived many different types of disasters?

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